Lawyer Jobs – How to Become a Successful Lawyer

What kind of work excites you? There are different kinds of career fields present these days. The opportunities are increasing with time but the competition is also increasing at the same time. Whichever field you might choose you will have to face a tough competition. Are you interested in lawyer jobs?

Legal career can be quite interesting. If you love to face challenges then this career is one of the best choices for you. There are some people who think that becoming a lawyer is an easy job. But this is not so. In fact it is quite tough.

If you want to become a successful lawyer then you must be ready for hard work for at least 6 to 7 years. If you are successful in law school only then you can go ahead to become one of the successful lawyers of the country.

Attorney jobs have so popular these days that a large section of students are trying out this field. This is the reason why the competition has increased. But do you know how to become a lawyer? There are certain steps which can help you get the legal jobs.

After finishing your school you must take up a bachelor degree course. This course is usually a four year program. You can choose any subject for your high school but it is always better to choose a law related subject in your degree course.

A major in the law subject will take you some steps ahead in your law career. After you pass out your bachelor’s degree you need to enter into a good law school. The major will also help you get you admission in the law school.

You can enter into the law field from any background. After the bachelors degree program you must take the admission test to the law school which is known as LSAT. This is an examination which helps you test your ability in taking up law as your profession.

It is very important for you to understand whether you are fit for the lawyer jobs or not. You must also remember that there are different types of lawyers. Criminal lawyers, civil lawyers are two of the most common types.

After you complete your law school and start practicing it is important for you to choose the type which suits your profile. If you want to become a successful lawyer and to perform well in the lawyer jobs then you must also have certain qualities present in you.

You must be honest and truthful to your clients. You must always be helpful and try your best to provide complete justice to them. After you become a lawyer you must not leave your studies.

The more you study the more you will get enlightened about this field. You can choose a good library to read books on law. Unless you create a strong ground for yourself in the legal jobs you would not be able to become successful. Follow these tips to become successful.

Lawyers Deserve Respect Too

Recently a prominent female Philadelphia lawyer was quoted in a newspaper article about an equal pay settlement she had reached with her former law firm, stating that she would never encourage her daughter to become a lawyer. Her opinion surprised me because her career was commendable and encompassed practicing with a large national law firm, having a top position as a lawyer in local government, and starting and operating her own law firm. I don’t agree that law is a poor career choice for women, but it is definitely a difficult career which requires working long hours, suffering frequent stress, and sometimes receiving little gratitude from the very people lawyers try to help. As a result, it is important for lawyers to develop thick skins in order to receive the most job satisfaction from practicing law.

There are many areas of legal practice, and not all of them involve dealing with the general public and/or regularly appearing before courts and legal forums. Often the stress of law involves being expected to bill a certain number of billable hours. Depending on one’s area(s) of practice, there are two primary means in which lawyers receive payment. They either bill in increments of an hour at an hourly rate, or if there is a contingency fee agreement, they collect their fees at the end of a case, it is tried or won in court. Sometimes there is a hybrid arrangement, which is the combination of the above two kinds of billing.

I have retained and paid lawyers for legal matters, so I am in the same position as my clients, but I respect lawyers, even if I wasn’t thrilled with the results, or I wasn’t pleased that I had to hire lawyers, because I felt the lawyers provided me with the best service they could. LET ME BE CLEAR-VERY FEW PEOPLE ARE HAPPY TO PAY THEIR LAWYERS. But, lawyers have to work within the legal system, which makes many demands on them. Although I respect lawyers, that respect is often lacking in others. Most lawyers have been on the receiving end of comments from former, current and potential clients which are rude, obnoxious and abusive. I can’t think of any other profession whose members have to endure this type of behavior. This abuse generally arises because: 1) the client is not happy with their situation or the legal process, and takes it out on the lawyer; or 2) the client is trying to avoid paying their bill and comes up with every excuse under the book to avoid payment.

For some reason clients forget or ignore that law firms are businesses, and not charities. I would love to be able to call the IRS and all of my creditors and tell them that as they obviously have a lot more money than me, so they should waive what I owe them. Of course this is ridiculous, yet it is a request I hear every so often after the client has exceeded their retainer and requests or requires additional services. Recently a client stated that it was not Godly and moral for me to request payment, after owing us an amount for years, because she allegedly can’t afford it. Although we are often willing to work within a client’s budget, our bills must be paid. We have salaries and bills to pay, an office building to maintain, and we also support other businesses whose services we use for supplies and various reasons. It is not fair not when clients ask us to feel their pain, but they don’t feel they have to treat us fairly.

Here are common questions clients have about bills:

1.) Clients sometimes express surprise that lawyers charge for phone calls and e mails on hourly rate cases, although this occupies a large part of their day. With the advent of e mail, clients often send many e mails a day and expect a quick response. Our fee agreements clearly states that we bill for these services. Let’s see how it works out if we didn’t charge for this time. As an example, let’s say there are 7 billable hours in a day (although my days are far longer), or 420 minutes. If I spend time on behalf of 15 current clients for e mails, or I spend time on calls with or regarding them, and I spend an average of 12 minutes on each call or e mail, that is 180 minutes or 3 hours. If 15 potential clients call or e mail me and I spend an average of 6 minutes speaking with them, that is another, 1½ hours or 90 minutes. That leaves 150 minutes or 2½ hours for me to attend meetings with other lawyers, clients or staff, or dealing with correspondence or legal documents. Using my $280 billable hourly rate for 2013 (which, by the way, is far too low based on my level of experience), and I don’t charge for the 3 hours above, I am losing potential fees of $840 a day, or $4,200 a week, or $210,000 a year. I would never ask my clients or any other professionals to work 3 hours a day for free.

People don’t often realize that lawyers, including me, contribute a great deal of unpaid time as they don’t charge for every minute of their time, they try and counsel people who aren’t certain how to deal with the legal system for free, and they often do some firm of pro bono work. WE NOT ONLY DESERVE SOME RESPECT, WE DESERVE A LOT OF RESPECT!

The Lawyers’ Guild Meets The Modern Age

It has become a cliche to say that we live in a globalized economy. But that doesn’t make it true – at least not for all of us.

For instance, the legal profession still operates in some respects as though we live in the 19th century, when new practitioners hung their shingles after merely “reading the law,” and judges and counselors alike served rural America by “riding the circuit.”

Granted, we do not have self-taught lawyers anymore – though the Internet may eventually change that. And only one state, Wisconsin, retains the diploma privilege, in which graduates of the state’s two accredited law schools are eligible for admission to the bar without first having to pass the much-feared bar examination.

But in most states, the legal profession still operates more like a preindustrial guild than a postindustrial industry. As an example, only lawyers are allowed to own law firms, on the dubious theory that outsiders’ capital, and the resulting increase in competition, would compromise the interests of clients. And individual lawyers may ply their trade only in states where they have secured individually state-issued licenses, though there are special provisions in which a court can grant limited permission for an out-of-stater to appear in a particular case.

Historically, each state has tied its licensing to its own individual bar exam. A lawyer wishing to relocate or to practice across state lines had to sit for multiple examinations in order to do so, except in cases where two states granted some form of reciprocity. Taking a new test requires not only a significant investment of time, but also significant additional fees.

That arrangement is slowly beginning to change, however.

Given the large body of federal law that applies in many situations, along with the large and growing body of uniform state laws that are based on a model statute and often adopted by state legislatures with little change, a national law credential would make a lot of sense. Unfortunately, it doesn’t exist. Nor is one on the horizon.

But the next best thing is a uniform national bar exam. That does exist, and New York recently announced plans to become the 16th, and so far the largest, state to implement it as of next year.

The test, called the Uniform Bar Examination, includes questions about general principles of law, along with six essay questions and two “skill tasks,” such as drafting a client letter or creating a memorandum. In New York, students will also have to pass a shorter multiple-choice exam with questions specific to New York state.

The major advantage of the Uniform Bar Exam for test-takers is that the score can be transferred across jurisdictions. So in the future, a lawyer who passes the bar in New York and who later relocates to Seattle can have her official transcript sent to Washington; if she meets Washington’s criteria, she can simply fulfill a few requirements instead of sitting for the entire test again. The more states that adopt the standardized test, the more attractive it will become.

The three states with larger populations than New York – California, Texas and Florida – do not offer the Uniform Bar Examination so far. Nor does Delaware, a state whose legal influence is outsize relative to its population because the state is home to many corporations. (Delaware lawyers do very well by this fact.) But many hope that New York’s adoption of the test may push other big states in that direction.

New York’s move has very little to do with serving the interests of the broader public. It has a lot to do with serving the interests of the state’s law schools, who – like everybody else these days – struggle to fill their classes. Jonathan Lippman, the chief judge of New York State, made this clear when discussing his decision to adopt the Uniform Bar Exam. “Law school enrollment for first-year students has declined 30 percent in the past four years,” he said, “and is at the lowest level since 1973.” (1) New York’s law schools would love to attract candidates who ultimately hope to practice elsewhere, where prospects for economic growth are better.

But just because New York is thinking of its schools and not its populace as such doesn’t mean this isn’t a useful step. Young Americans are no longer likely to spend their entire working careers in states where they grow up or go to school. Nor are they well-served by having their professional practice limited to just one state. A universal bar exam would recognize this new reality.

The legal profession remains about as far from the globalized world as young Abe Lincoln was from the jet age. The trend toward the Uniform Bar Examination is at least a small step in the right direction. It is also a sign that the people who set the rules for the legal community may have at least a vague awareness of the world around them.

Source:

1) Brooklyn Daily Eagle, “Brooklyn Law School dean reflects on NY adoption of uniform bar exam”

Understanding Your Personality And The Right Career Path

Your personality greatly affects your performance in a given career. Studies show that 90% of people get into the wrong careers as they don’t know their personalities. This results to most people living unfulfilled lives. Others choose to leave their careers and venture into other areas. To increase your chances of being successful and enjoy what you do you need to join the right career path from the start.

Types of personalities

While we may appear similar on the outside, we are very different. How we act and carry ourselves is greatly determined by out personalities. The different types of personalities include:

Introverts: These are the quiet people. They love working alone or in small groups. When working, they prefer working at a more deliberate pace and love focusing on one task at a time.

Extroverts: They are the exact opposites of introverts. They are often people of high energy, love engaging in a variety of tasks and work at a quick pace. They are highly effective at multitasking.

Thinkers: These highly rely on logical analysis of situations. Before they make a decision, they have to weigh the pros and cons of everything that they do. They value fairness, honesty, and consistency.

Sensors: They are said to be realistic people as they focus on facts and details. They also apply common sense and get insight from past experiences for them to come up with practical solutions to the problems at hand.

Feelers: From their name, feelers are people that highly rely on their feelings for them to make a decision. They are highly sensitive and decide things depending on their values and how their actions will affect other people.

Intuitive: These people focus on the possibilities and the big picture. They value innovation, easily see patterns and when they are solving problems, they don’t rely on the already established solutions-they come up with their own creative ways of solving the problem.

Perceivers: They prefer keeping the options open and love acting spontaneously. They love being flexible when they are making their plans and decisions.

Judgers: Judgers are highly organized people that like sticking to plans. They are usually very good at following rules.

Best careers for the different personalities

According to experts, there is no one with only one personality; all of us are a combination of different personalities but there is always one personality that is more dominant than the others. Different personality combinations are ideal for different careers. Extroverts, sensors, thinkers, and judgers make good pharmacists, judges, project managers, insurance sales agents, and lawyers. Introverts, sensors, thinkers and perceivers can make good pilots, economists, emergency room physicians, data analysts, and civil engineers.

Introverts, intuitive, feelers and perceivers are sensitive people who are motivated by their personal values. These attributes make them great physical therapists, graphic designers, writers, psychologists, and trainers. Extroverts, intuitive, perceivers and thinkers make excellent entrepreneurs, real estate developers, marketing directors, politicians, and creative directors.

Conclusion

Your personality has a great impact on your success in your career but this doesn’t mean that you will be a failure if you choose a career that doesn’t complement your personality. If you work hard and you love what you do you will definitely be a success.

Law Career Options – Best Actions for Great Decisions

Are you thinking about working legal services but still wondering what law career suits you best? Are you a graduate of another field of decide to shift your career in later life to get into law school? What career path are you seeking for full satisfaction?

The field of law, like any other fields, offers a lot of career options that will not make you stuck in the office or in a firm handling almost the same case every year. You will not just also end up as a barrister or a solicitor. You have a lot of options to choose from, it is important to focus on your interests, and passions before you decide which law career choice are you planning to excel on.

Here are the various career options or areas of expertise that you can dwell on to match your goals and natural passions.

1. Public Service

If you are a lawyer who got much interest in serving the public and taking various administrative roles, you can apply to any federal or state public service providers. This sector offers a great opportunity for a lawyer with a heart for public service to administer public legal work as either a project manager or a policy officer.

2. Business Sector

The field of business also needs lawyers who can help them with the complexities of legal issues in the business context. Big companies and international businesses hire their own company lawyers to attend to their business legal standards and processes to meet government demands for the continued growth.

Corporate lawyers and in-house lawyers are greatly in demand these days with the rise of international businesses and huge companies worldwide. Career choices in the business sector are in the field of telecommunications, energy, mining, banking and other private roles that in-house lawyers take within a company.

3. Legal Research

You may be a type of lawyer who is not accustomed to sit in the office or a firm handling lots of paper works and other professional responsibilities in a regular office setting. You could be a smart adventurous lawyer who loves exciting challenges all he time for more action and satisfaction in the legal context, a legal research position is what you exactly need to jam into.

4. Non-government Organizations

This is commonly known as NGO. The scopes of these organizations are the charitable institutions, advocacy bodies, social service agencies and humanitarian organizations. They always seek for lawyers who naturally show sincere interests in this nature of work.

5. Law Enforcement Sector

You do not have to be a police officer to join such famous groups as the CIA, FBI, and the Secret Service or in any other law enforcement agency. These major law enforcement bodies employ lawyers to handle some complex legal issues that are covered by the state or the federal government.

The lists are almost endless. The law enforcement and business sectors usually offer higher compensations and benefits. Most of these law career fields even include various insurances, paid leave or vacation advantages, special options for early retirement and other valuable packages. The key factor to consider here is not the salary or benefits but your individual choice and preferences that will truly make you happy and satisfied in your chosen career.